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Tuesday, 17 July 2018

Red Sovine born 17 July 1917


Woodrow Wilson "Red" Sovine (July 7, 1917 – April 4, 1980) was an American country music singer and songwriter associated with truck driving songs, particularly those recited as narratives, but set to music. The most noted examples are his 1965 number one hit "Giddyup Go" and his 1976 number one hit "Teddy Bear".

Sovine was born as Woodrow Wilson Sovine in 1917 in Charleston,
West Virginia, earning the nickname "Red" because of his reddish-brown hair. He had two brothers and two sisters. Sovine  was taught to play guitar by his mother. His first venture into music was with his childhood friend Johnnie Bailes, with whom he performed as "Smiley and Red, the Singing Sailors" in the country music revue Jim Pike's Carolina Tar Heels on WWVA in Wheeling, West Virginia. Faced with limited success, Bailes left to perform as part of The Bailes Brothers. Sovine got married, and continued to sing on Charleston radio, while holding down a job as a supervisor of a hosiery factory. With the encouragement of Bailes, Sovine formed The Echo Valley Boys.

After a year of performing in West Virginia, Sovine moved to
Shreveport, Louisiana, where the Bailes Brothers were performing on KWKH. Sovine's own early morning show wasn't very popular, but he gained greater exposure performing on the famed KWKH radio program, "The Louisiana Hayride". One of his co-stars was Hank Williams, who steered Sovine toward a better time slot at WFSA in Montgomery, Alabama, and toward a contract with MGM Records in 1949. In that same year, Red replaced Williams on Louisiana Hayride when Williams jumped to the Grand Ole Opry. Over the next four years he recorded 28 singles, mostly following in Williams' honky tonk footsteps, that didn't make much of a dent on the charts but did
establish him as a solid performer.

Another "Louisiana Hayride" co-star that helped Sovine along was country music legend Webb Pierce. Pierce convinced Sovine to lead his Wondering Boys band and helped him along toward a contract with Decca in 1954. The following year Sovine cut a duet with Goldie Hill, "Are You Mine?", which peaked in the Top 15, and in 1956 he had his first number one hit when he duetted with Pierce on a cover of George Jones' "Why Baby Why".


                         

Sovine had two other Top Five singles that year and joined the cast of the Grand Ole Opry. After recording close to 50 sides with Decca by 1959, Sovine signed to Starday Records and began
touring the club circuit as a solo act.

In 1963, Sovine passed on the helping hand given him by older performers when he heard the singing of African-American minor league baseball player Charley Pride and suggested that he move to Nashville, Tennessee . Sovine opened doors for Pride at Pierce's Cedarwood Publishing, but his own career had stalled-- "Dream House for Sale", which reached number 22 in 1964, came nearly eight years after his last hit.

In 1965, however, Sovine at last found his niche when he recorded "Giddy-Up Go", which, like most of his other trucker hits, was co-written by himself with Tommy Hill.
It is spoken, rather than sung, as the words of an older long-distance truck driver who rediscovers his long-lost son driving another truck on the same highway. The song spent six weeks atop the country charts and even crossed over to the pop charts. Other truck-driving hits followed, including Teddy Bear.  He was given the title of “King Of The Narrations” due to these spoken hit recordings.

On 4 April, 1980, Red Sovine suffered a heart attack while driving his Dodge van in the city of Nashville, Tennessee which caused him to crash. The injuries sustained from the wreck and Sovine's heart attack were fatal.


For many years after his death, his Greatest Hits collection ("The Best Of Red Sovine") was advertised on television; exposing his music to a new generation of fans who would not have otherwise heard of him. In 2007, many of his songs were played in Washington, DC and Richmond, Virginia on the "Elliot in the Morning" Show, exposing Sovine's music to a generation that may have never heard of him without Elliot's help. (edited from Wikipedia)

A tear-jerker from the undisputed King of Country Tear Jerk Songs, Red Sovine. Red was a guest on Porter Wagoner's TV Show in 1961 and sang his new song.

1 comment:

boppinbob said...

For “Red Sovine ‎– Juke Joint Johnny” go here:

https://www42.zippyshare.com/v/cSs56dbz/file.html

1. Okey Dokey 2:31
2. When I Get Rich 2:29
3. Sundown Sue 2:37
4. You're Barking Up The Wrong Tree Now 2:28
5. I'm Gonna Lock My Heart (And Throw Away The Key) 2:33
6. The Intoxicated Rat (My Little Rat Tk 1) 2:33
7. I'll Worry You Out Of My Mind 2:45
8. Billy Goat Boogie 2:46
9. Don't Worry 2:20
10. Till Today 2:42
11. It'd Surprise You 2:21
12. Farewell, So Long, Goodbye 2:24
13. Sixteen Tons 2:23
14. Juke Joint Johnny 2:29
15. I Hope You Don't Care 2:51
16. My Little Rat (Tk 2) 2:35
17. No Thanks, Bartender 2:34
18. You're Calling Me Sweetheart 2:08
19. Why Baby Why 2:32
20. Wild Beating Heart 2:43
21. You Used To Be My Baby 1:50
22. Don't Drop It 2:09
23. How Do You Think I Feel 2:18
24. Down On The Corner Of Love 2:22
25. Poor Man's Riches 2:07
26. Are You Mine 2:42
27. Courtin' Time In Tennessee 2:18
28. Hold Everything (Till I Get Home) 2:04
29. Ko Ko Mo (I Love You So) 2:37
30. Four Arms 2:24
31. The Cajun Queen 2:44

Red Sovine's 2012 installment in Bear Family's ongoing country boogie & rockabilly series is called Juke Joint Johnny after the 1957 single that may be the high-water mark for Sovine's wild side. The other 30 songs on this cracking little compilation usually follow this path, collecting jumping, swinging boogie he cut in the '50s for MGM and Decca, songs that are a far cry from the honky tonk and truck-driving anthems that brought Sovine fame in the late '60s and '70s

For “Red Sovine - Hold Everything (Till I Get Home)” go here:

https://www82.zippyshare.com/v/5nxp9J1K/file.html
THE ONE AND ONLY RED SOVINE
1. NO MONEY IN THIS DEAL
2. ONE IS A LONELY NUMBER
3. INVITATION TO THE BLUES
4. IF I COULD COME BACK
5. BRAND NEW LOW
6. HOLD EVERYTHING (Till I Get Home)
7. LITTLE ROSA
8. WHY BABY, WHY
9. COLOR OF THE BLUES
10. HEART OF A MAN
11. LONG TIME TO FORGET
12. MORE FROM HABIT THAN DESIRE

GOLDEN COUNTRY BALLADS OF THE 60s
13. EAST OF WEST BERLIN
14. A WOUND TIME CAN'T ERASE
15. THANKS FOR NOTHING
16. WILLOW TREE
17. TEARS BROKE OUT ON ME
18. LOSING YOUR LOVE
19. SHE CAN'T READ MY WRITING
20. TENDER YEARS
21. IF A WOMAN ANSWERS (Hang Up The Phone)
22. HELLO FOOL
23. THERE'S ALWAYS ONE (Who Loves A Lot)
24. ROSE OF LOVE

Presented here are two albums country star, Red Sovine released in 1961 and 1962. At the end of 1955 Red secured his first country No. 1, a duet with Webb Pierce entitled 'Why Baby, Why'. He enjoyed two more solo top 10 country hits with 'Little Rosa' and 'Hold Everything (Till I Get Home)'.

Also featured are a plethora of classic country songs such as the jukebox favourites, 'One Is A Lonely Number' and 'No Money In This Deal' plus covers of recent hits including 'Tender Years' which was a No. 1 hit for George Jones in 1961.

Red actually suffered quite the hit 'drought', however he still managed strong album sales and listening to the 24 tracks on this set we think that you will quickly see why he remained a popular 'draw' in country music circles.(Jasmine notes)