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Wednesday, 12 October 2016

Nappy Brown born 12 October 1929


Napoleon Brown Goodson Culp (October 12, 1929 – September 20, 2008) better known by his stage name Nappy Brown, was an American R&B singer. His hits include the 1955 Billboard chart #2, "Don't Be Angry" and "Night Time Is the Right Time". His style is instantly recognizable; Brown used a wide vibrato, melisma, and distinctive extra syllables.
Brown was the son of Kathryn Culp and Sammie Lee Brown. After his mother died he was brought up by Fred and Maggie Culp. They attended Gethsemane AME Zion Church and he attended school in Charlotte, North Carolina.
He began his career singing gospel music before switching to R&B. In 1954 he won a recording contract with Savoy Records, which yielded a series of hits, including "Don't Be Angry" (#2 R&B, #25 pop, 1955), "Pitter Patter" (#10 R&B, 1955). Brown was among the biggest stars in R&B, frequently touring with the revues of Alan Freed.
 
 


His songs, along with those of his peers and contemporaries (such as Little Richard, Chuck Berry, and Fats Domino), were among the first wave of African-American pop music to become noticed and popular with white audiences.


“Nappy” Brown, Junior Parker, Elvis, Bobby “Blue” Bland
Elvis Presley reportedly used to see Brown perform whenever he appeared in Memphis. In addition to Brown's influence on blues music, and 1950s R&B and pop, Brown's powerful and protean voice, combined with his distinctive emotive style, is widely viewed as a key link in the development of soul music.
The pop-tinged “It Don’t Hurt No More” restored Nappy to the R&B charts in 1958, and he repeated the feat with the powerful “I Cried Like A Baby” the next year. But rock and roll had softened significantly, soul was still in its infancy, and most of Brown’s spectacular Savoy offerings failed to find a substantial audience. Nappy remained with the company through 1962 before largely disappearing from public view apart from an obscure ‘69 album for the equally unknown Elephant label.
In the early 1980s, a renewed interest in R&B led to some of Brown's early songs being released on European albums. At the urging of Bob Margolin, former guitarist for Muddy Waters's band and a fan of Brown, Brown returned to the music industry, beginning with a successful tour of Scandinavia in 1983. In 1984, 14 years since his last recording, Brown signed with Landslide Records and released the album Tore Up with The Heartfixers. Other recordings followed.
Brown's Savoy Records hit, Piddly Patter was featured in the John Waters film, Cry-Baby, starring Johnny Depp.
Nappy Brown's final album, Long Time Coming, recorded in May 2007, on Blind Pig Records, was released on September 25, 2007. Reviews were overwhelmingly positive; the album and Brown were each nominated for a Blues Music Award (the genre's highest honour). The album, produced by Scott Cable, featured the guitarists Sean Costello, Bob Margolin, Junior Watson, and other special guests performing Brown's hits and several new songs. In the fall of 2007, Nappy Brown was Living Blues Magazine's September cover artist, and followed that honour with a European tour. Brown was a musical guest on Garrison Keillor's Prairie Home Companion on October 20, 2007.
At the ceremony for the Blues Music Awards in May 2008, Brown gave one last electrifying performance, capping an incredible comeback year. On June 1, 2008 following a performance at the Crawfish Festival in Augusta, New Jersey, Brown fell ill due to series of ailments and was hospitalized. In his last conversation with his wife Ann, Nappy said that this last year was the best of his life and was brought to tears by reading all of the cards and letters from fans.  He died in his sleep on September 20, 2008 at Mercy Hospital in Charlotte, North Carolina at the age of 78.

 
Brown was inducted into the Blues Hall of Fame on August 24, 2002. (Info mainly Wikipedia) Here's Nappy Brown with The Bloodshot Eyes - "Who"
(Pori Jazz Festival / Novo Stage, Pori, Finland, July 15, 1999)

1 comment:

boppinbob said...

For “Down in the Alley - The Complete Savoy Singles As & Bs 1954-1962 (2CD) go here:

Disc 1

http://www12.zippyshare.com/v/lwMeFDz0/file.html
1. I WONDER (What's Wrong With Me)
2. THAT MAN
3. TWO FACED WOMAN AND A LYING MAN
4. IS IT TRUE, IS IT TRUE
5. DON'T BE ANGRY (1955 Version)
6. IS IT REALLY YOU
7. PITTER PATTER
8. THERE'LL COME A DAY
9. JUST A LITTLE LOVE
10. WELL, WELL, WELL, BABY-LA
11. DOOD'LL I LOVE YOU
12. SITTIN' IN THE DARK
13. OPEN UP THAT DOOR (And Walk Right In My Heart)
14. PLEASIN' YOU
15. AM I
16. LOVE, BABY
17. I'M GETTING LONESOME
18. LITTLE BY LITTLE
19. PRETTY GIRL (Yea-Yea-Yea)
20. I'M GONNA GET YOU (Get You Someday)
21. GOODY-GOODY-GUM DROP
22. BYE BYE BABY
23 THE RIGHT TIME
24. OH YOU DON'T KNOW
25. I'M IN THE MOOD
26. IF YOU NEED SOME LOVIN'
27. SKIDY WOE

Disc 2

http://www46.zippyshare.com/v/yHltw6Jp/file.html
1. IT DON'T HURT NO MORE
2. MY BABY
3. YOU'RE GOING TO NEED SOMEONE
4. A LONG TIME
5. ALLRIGHT NOW
6. THIS IS MY CONFESSION
7. FOR THOSE WHO LOVE
8. I CRIED LIKE A BABY
9. SO DEEP
10. GIVE ME YOUR LOVE
11. TOO SHY
12. DOWN IN THE ALLEY
13. MY BABY KNOWS
14. BABY-CRY-CRY-CRY-BABY
15. WHAT'S COME OVER YOU BABY
16. BABY I GOT NEWS FOR YOU
17. APPLE OF MY EYE
18. THE HOLE I'M IN
19. NOBODY CAN SAY
20. COAL MINER
21. HOONIE-BOONIE
22. ANY TIME IS THE RIGHT TIME
23. DON'T BE ANGRY (1961 Version)
24. I'VE HAD MY FUN
25. DIDN'T YOU KNOW
26. THE LOCK ON THE DOOR
27. SO GLAD I DON'T HAVE TO CRY NO MORE

When we talk about those artists who represent the transition between blues/r&b and soul it is usually Ray Charles, James Brown and Sam Cooke who come to the fore. The subject of this 2CD collection, Nappy Brown is not usually in the mix but after you have listened to this collection of his singles released between 1954 and 1962 you will certainly be wondering why.

Hear Brown's voice bellow and roar across these 54 tracks and on hits like 'Don't Be Angry', 'Pitter Patter' and 'It Don't Hurt No More'. The gospel delivery and arrangement of 'The Right Time' caught the attention of a young Ray Charles who was currently hitting the big time with outrageous blues versions of gospel songs. He covered it and retitled it '(Night Time Is) The Right Time' and secured a hit that eventually went on to become a standard.

Nappy never compromised his sound despite his huge popularity in the teen pop market and as such this collection really doesn't sound as old as it is. (Jasmine Records)